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Reaming

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Reaming

Postby ratatosk » Thu Jul 16, 2015 2:18 am

I've had a British Butner reamer for decades which I only used once with disturbing results. I generally have a fairly thin, hard cake, so I have not bothered with reaming since.

But I got a Castleford reamer set many months ago when I noticed that several pipes were getting ridges in the cake. I did not break it out until last week when I set to work on a couple of old Petes and gradually worked my way up to some Dunhills. I just used it on a James Upshall and found that every time, the pipes smoked much sweeter and better than before.

I don't smoke crap blends, so my point is that regular reaming may be the way to keep a pipe smoking well, just always go slow, gentle and easy. Anyone else find the same to be true?
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Re: Reaming

Postby KevLa » Fri Jul 17, 2015 11:52 pm

ratatosk wrote:...my point is that regular reaming may be the way to keep a pipe smoking well, just always go slow, gentle and easy. Anyone else find the same to be true?

It certainly helps, and yeah, regular, gentle reaming is what I've found to be best, too :)
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Re: Reaming

Postby Geo3rge » Sat Jul 18, 2015 2:54 am

Couldn't agree more. Something about getting that inner chamber surface nice and smooth again; it seems to make the smoke sing.
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Re: Reaming

Postby aquaholic » Mon Jul 20, 2015 12:37 pm

Agreed....for me, I get the best smokes when I have a thin even cake.

That Castleford reamer is the best I've found too.
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Re: Reaming

Postby 4nogginsmike » Tue Sep 29, 2015 8:02 pm

For too long a time I have found that I scar the wood with a standard reamer. I've stopped using it and turned to a knife blade. I keep the cake way down. After a smoke I inspect the bowl, and if there is a significant deposit, I scrape it away with the serrated edge of a cleaning tool in my pipe tool. This helps a lot. But as it builds to the thickness of a dime, I simply scrape the walls with my knife blade at a 90 degree angle to the chamber wall.

A pipe tool is just too sharp for me, and I don't seem to be able to connect the proper force needed to remove just the cake, not the wood.
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Re: Reaming

Postby hooboy » Mon Nov 09, 2015 3:27 pm

Castleford make several types of reamers, knives ets.
Which of these are being refered to ? thanks
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Re: Reaming

Postby ratatosk » Thu Nov 12, 2015 12:00 am

I have this set, http://www.4noggins.com/castleford-t-handle-pipe-reamer-set.aspx. It's pretty cheap and works great, the only negative is the plastic T-handle, but it's fairly sturdy.
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Re: Reaming

Postby Piperman » Thu Nov 12, 2015 12:15 am

This is mine.....

http://www.4noggins.com/seniorpipereamertool.aspx

Works fine, I have no complaints.....
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Re: Reaming

Postby hooboy » Thu Nov 12, 2015 3:07 pm

Thanks Guys for the links . I have the senior and agree it does a good job, But always open to new ideas!
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Re: Reaming

Postby PuFFaH » Thu Nov 12, 2015 4:29 pm

Only fault that could be applied to the Castleford is its inability to adjust to the taper in the bore. You can ruin a pipe if not suited to the Castleford parallel ream. I would recommend the Butner for no other reason than it suits all pipes and reams to the very heal of the bore. It is not agressive and can be sharpened with a file to adjust this. Another benifit is portability.
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Re: Reaming

Postby Geo3rge » Fri Nov 13, 2015 1:12 pm

After years of pervering with the old T shaped reaming tool, during which time it bent out of true and began to cut into the chamber, I recently purchased a Senior and that's the one for me now. Easy to use and adjust, it will do for this pipe smoker for the next few years.
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Re: Reaming

Postby PuFFaH » Fri Nov 13, 2015 4:13 pm

Steve, can you or someone explain how the Senior pipe reamer can ream evenly to the bottom of the bowl and maintain chamber shape. I just couldn't see how it could so never used mine after a few attempts.
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Re: Reaming

Postby ratatosk » Fri Nov 13, 2015 10:43 pm

Regarding tapered chambers, I also have an old British Butner that I bought in the early 80s and tend to use that instead of the Castleford set for those pipes. It isn't impossible to use Castleford for them, but you have to start with the smallest bit and go really slow while swapping bits and limiting depth as you work your way up, the Butner is just easier to use and gives a better result. That said, the Butner is more problematic when dealing with a straight chamber, so there is room for both.
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Re: Reaming

Postby HowlinWolf » Fri Nov 13, 2015 11:26 pm

Piperman wrote:This is mine.....

http://www.4noggins.com/seniorpipereamertool.aspx

Works fine, I have no complaints.....


I have the prehistoric version of this, called the Kleen Reem. It works great and the drill that stores in the handle is A+++ for chasing accumulated gunk out of the shank airway (beats the hell out of using three dozen pipe cleaners soaked in alcohol ;) )

It stands to reason that over time cake is absorbing gunk and the gunk just sits there and gets stale and nasty, so reaming out some of the excess, even though the cake isn't "too thick" is probably still a good idea.
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Re: Reaming

Postby PuFFaH » Sat Nov 14, 2015 9:56 am

I have taken another look at my Senior pipe reamer feeling that I may have missed the point of the weird shape of the cutting faces. Sorry to say that my first impression stands. It's not the right shape to ream a bowl to its bottom and only seems suited to removing the cake at the top of the bowl.
So does this mean that reaming the cake evenly to the heal of the bowl is not normal practice?
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Re: Reaming

Postby HowlinWolf » Sat Nov 14, 2015 1:13 pm

PuFFaH wrote:Senior pipe reamer... not the right shape to ream a bowl to its bottom and only seems suited to removing the cake at the top of the bowl.


I've looked at pictures of the Senior reamer, and aside from a difference in the profile of the cutting faces it appears to be the same tool as my Kleen Reem.

On pipes with narrow diameter bowls, even the minimum diameter setting of the Kleen Reem is too wide, so I have run into what you are describing. On pipes with very wide bowls, even the maximum diameter is too narrow, for those pipes I use it to ream the floor of the bowl and as far up the sides as I can. But for average sized pipes it works top to bottom. On those pipes, don't try to do it all in one pass. Start with the tool set to just flick off the textured part of the cake, then widen the tool by a very small widening, repeat the widening several times to complete the job.

What I wonder about are the reamers that have medieval-looking spikes sticking out of them... How do they work? How do they provide an even finished surface? Don't they bite in too much? Etc.
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Re: Reaming

Postby hooboy » Wed Dec 09, 2015 2:23 pm

HowlinWolf, I was in error when I said I had a senior, mine too is the kein ream , And the bit included is great especialy the hole in the cutting end which take a short pipe cleaner, it makes stem cleaning easy!
( I know this a much debated idea BUT I use the bit to enlarge the air hole And in some I go larger than this) I agree with Rick Newcombe in his book "in search of pipe dreams" that MOST pipes draft holes are too small. This again is my opinion and realize some agree and some disagree in this theory.
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Re: Reaming

Postby hooboy » Mon Mar 21, 2016 3:08 pm

Recently I had a discussion with one of my pipe smoking friends and after hearing his final remark I thought that I would share it
With the forum....
We were discussing the merits of different reamers when he suddenly stopped and said " You know I should get the wife to join in this discussion, for I know for a fact she over the years has perfected "REAMING" to a fine Art!
Those who don't have a spouse will probably NOT understand this statement.

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Re: Reaming

Postby KevinM » Wed Apr 06, 2016 1:43 pm

I have an old Senior reamer gifted to me many years ago. It works well but the angle of the blades does make reaming the bottom of the bowl problematic. Especially on conical shaped bowls. Regardless, I do find periodic reaming enhances the Smoking quality of my pipes.
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Re: Reaming

Postby Geo3rge » Wed Apr 06, 2016 11:01 pm

KevinM wrote:I have an old Senior reamer gifted to me many years ago. It works well but the angle of the blades does make reaming the bottom of the bowl problematic. Especially on conical shaped bowls. Regardless, I do find periodic reaming enhances the Smoking quality of my pipes.


I agree, Kevin. A nice, smooth and clean interior seems to make all the difference. It's great just to feel that it's had a 'shave' and tidy up.
It also gives me a good conscience about the state of my pipes!
My Senior Reamer suits me fine for all of my pipes at the moment.
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